About Us

St Peter's Church, Church Road, Blaenavon. Undated. (Image: CD2003_609_019 / NPRN: 96484) Commonwood strip field system, Holt, Wrexham. 1994. (Image: CD2003_624_007 / NPRN: 400795) Gorseddau Slate Quarry, Dolbenmaen. 1996. (Image: DI2006_0252 / NPRN: 40557)

Commissioner Profiles

Dr Eurwyn Wiliam (Chairman), MA, PhD, FSA

After graduating in archaeology, Eurwyn’s early career followed his other interest of traditional architecture and conservation. He was appointed to create a new Department of Buildings at the Welsh Folk Museum (subsequently The Museum of Welsh Life and now St Fagans: National History Museum) in 1971 and twenty years later was made Director of the Museum. Whilst there he was responsible for the re-erection of the popular terrace of cottages from Rhyd-y-car, Merthyr Tydfil, and acquired many other buildings including the mediaeval church from Llandeilo Tal-y-bont, Glamorgan.

He then moved to corporate roles within the National Museum of Wales, where his last post was as Director of Collections & Research and Deputy Director General. While there, he led the integration into the National Museum of Big Pit Mining Museum and its redevelopment and the creation of the new Waterfront Museum in partnership with the City and County of Swansea. He retired from the National Museum in 2009 when he was given the title of Emeritus Keeper. Eurwyn retains an academic interest in archaeology, museology and traditional architecture. He is author of many books and articles on these subjects, on which he lectures frequently. He has been a committee member or trustee of many heritage bodies.

Eurwyn was a Commissioner from 1992 to 2006, during which time he chaired the Uplands Archaeology Steering Committee and the Editorial Committee, and was Vice Chairman 2002-2006. He was appointed Chairman in 2009 and re-appointed for a further five years in 2014. His book The Welsh Cottage: Building Traditions of the Rural Poor, 1750-1900 has been a best-seller for the Royal Commission.

Contact details:

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Tel: 01970 621200

Email nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk

Henry Owen-John, BA, MCIfA, FSA

Henry read Ancient History and Archaeology at Birmingham University. From 1977 to 1991 he worked for the Glamorgan Gwent Archaeological Trust directing and publishing rescue excavations. As Deputy Director he helped to develop the Trust’s planning advisory services for local authorities in South East Wales. In 1991 Henry joined English Heritage as Inspector of Ancient Monuments for the north east and from 1998 to 2014 held management positions for English Heritage in the North West, including 10 years as Planning Director, heading a multi-disciplinary team providing planning advice on the historic environment to local councils and grant aid for heritage assets at risk. In June 2014 he took up post as Head of International Advice for English Heritage advising government on the application of UNESCO and other Conventions. In April 2015 English Heritage divided into two organisations; Henry now works in the Government Advice Team of Historic England.

Henry was appointed a Commissioner in 2005 and draws on his practical knowledge of the historic environment, management and leadership in his duties as Vice-chair of the Commission, Chair of the Knowledge and Understanding Committee, and as a member of the Corporate Governance Committee.

Contact details:

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Tel: 01970 621200

Email nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk

Ms Catherine Hardman BA, MA, FSA

Catherine has always had an interest in history and archaeology so after an early career in the Home Civil Service serving in Whitehall with the Ministry of Defence, and in Belfast with the Northern Ireland Office, Catherine returned to university to study archaeology in earnest. Catherine’s time studying at the universities of Bradford and York helped hone her interest in heritage management issues and she joined the Archaeology Data Service (ADS), based in the University of York’s Archaeology Department, in 2001. As Deputy Director at the ADS she played a lead role in negotiating access to secure archives and UK focussed liaison. Catherine has recently returned to Whitehall having taken up the post of Head of Preservation and Access at the Parliamentary Archives, based in the House of Lords, where she oversees the work of a team managing digital preservation, collection care and cataloguing.

Catherine has been a Commissioner since May 2010 and is a member of the Strategy Group and Chair of the Commission’s Public Services Committee. She works with Commission staff to enhance digital archiving provision for the sector in Wales and helps provide an insight into current activities and trends in digital preservation across the UK.

Contact details:

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Tel: 01970 621200

Email nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk

Jonathan Hudson MBCS, CITP

Based in North Devon, Jonathan became a Commissioner in 2005. He has over 25 years’ experience as an independent consultant and advisor. He has been an Information Technology practitioner for forty years, and has significant experience developing strategies for business change and development in the public and private sectors.

His involvement as a Commissioner includes: use of technology to enhance the work of, and public access to, the information held by the Commission. Jonathan is also a member of the Commission’s forward looking Strategy Group and chairs the Corporate Governance Committee.

Contact details:

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Tel: 01970 621200

Email nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk

Thomas Lloyd, MA, OBE, DL, FSA

Tom Lloyd is from the Tywi valley in Carmarthenshire, an area filled with ancient castles and old houses, which inspired him from early days. After reading Classics and Law at Cambridge, he practiced as a solicitor in London for ten years before giving way to his real interests and returning to Wales, where he has since devoted himself principally to historic buildings and wider heritage issues in both the public and private sector.

Before leaving London, he had researched and written his first book The Lost Houses of Wales, which led to appointments to the Historic Buildings Council for Wales, of which he was subsequently Chair for ten years, and to becoming a Director of the Wales Tourist Board, particularly to promote the heritage aspect of Welsh tourism. In the private sector, he chaired The Buildings At Risk Trust which restored a number of important buildings in disrepair across England and Wales, including grade I listed Sker House near Porthcawl, which had been abandoned for decades. He researched and co-authored the two south west Wales volumes of The Pevsner series of architectural guides and has written for journals and magazines. Interested also in fine art, he was Sotheby’s consultant in Wales for ten years at the time when Sotheby’s held several major auctions in Wales.

Since 2011, he has been the Wales Herald of Arms Extraordinary and more recently has been appointed Chair of The Cathedrals and Churches Commission which oversees and advises on planning matters relating to religious buildings.

Contact details:

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Tel: 01970 621200

Email nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk

Professor Chris Williams, BA, PhD, FRHistS

Chris Williams is a historian who studied at the universities of Oxford and Cardiff before becoming a lecturer at Cardiff in the late 1980s. He has worked at the University of Glamorgan (now the University of South Wales) and at Swansea University and is now back at Cardiff as Professor of History and Head of the School of History, Archaeology and Religion. Chris specialises in modern Welsh and modern British history, with a particular focus on the history of the labour movement and the South Wales coalfield. In 2012 he edited The Richard Burton Diaries for Yale University Press. He joined the Commission in 2008. Having amassed considerable experience in editing book series for the Board of Celtic Studies and the South Wales Record Society, it was perhaps inevitable that he should end up chairing the Commission’s Publications Group, having oversight of its publications strategy.

Contact details:

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Tel: 01970 621200

Email nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk

Dr Mark Redknap, BA, PhD, MIFA, FSA

Dr Mark Redknap went on his first archaeological excavation for his local museum in Coventry when he was 13, and his early digging experiences confirmed the benefits of community participation in rediscovering our past. He is Head of Collections & Research in the Department of History & Archaeology, Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales, he became a Commissioner in 2008. His fieldwork, research and publications cover aspects of terrestrial and maritime archaeology, with a recent focus on early medieval and medieval archaeology: Vikings, metalwork and Gothic ivories. Publications include corpora on Roman, Frankish and Carolingian pottery made in Germany at Mayen, and early medieval inscribed stones and stone sculpture in Wales. Exhibitions include Recreations: Visualizing Our Past and Origins: in search of Early Wales. He has been writing up the excavation of the early medieval royal crannog on Llangorse Lake (with Cardiff University), and has directed fieldwork on the early medieval centre at Llanbedrgoch on Anglesey. He provides reports on possible early medieval and later treasure to coroners in Wales, and is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.

Contact details:

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales.

Tel: 01970 621200

Email nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk